ICT

Preparing for ITIL Service Strategy Exam

This weekend, I’ve been preparing for my third ITIL – or rather: ITSM – exam. Having successfully passed ST & CSI, service transition and continuous service improvement, it’s now time for some service strategy, SS.

I am honestly excited about getting more insight into service strategy. This is, because it seems to me it differs strongly from the other lifecycle. While service design, service transition and service operations clearly lays focus on technical planning and processes – thus, I consider them as a somewhat generic view of project management – and CSI reminds me of process optimization, SS deals with the most senior management view of ITSM. I find this particularly interesting, since IT staff often neglects the fact that it’s not the users that pay, but rather senior managers that decide about funding – or not funding.

For instance, I learned about separated IT governance not being a requirement. Using the definition of ISO/IEC 38500 for this term, which is actually “Corporate Governance of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)“, IT governance is shifted strongly towards business. CIO should, of course, be part of the senior corporate governance body, however, as mentioned before, it is not required to have an IT governance board. I was dashed, though, but from the business point of view this makes sense.

Anyways, I read the SS core publication and tried the SS sample paper provided by Axelos. With 36 out of 40 possible points (28 needed) I am feeling pretty well prepared.

My Result of Sample Exam ITIL SS

Which, unfortunately, does not mean I am not nervous about the upcoming real exam. Hopefully, I shall pass this exam, too, making it three more left: SO, SD and MALC … I definitely want to have passed the last one by spring 2016.

Finally, an advice to others preparing for this exam: learn to think like a senior manager. Especially when it comes to sourcing strategies. Always focus on what is best for the corporation. Senior managers naturally and reasonably (need to) care less about ICT itself, but about the value added to the business.

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